Waxing Lyrical a day before Wednesday

Click image to find source of image.

I have in the past posted a poem – on a Wednesday purely because waxing and Wednesday start with the letter W. That’s pretty much the extent of my ‘wordsmithery‘.

But today is World Poetry Day and so here is a poem on a Tuesday. A dear friend recently lost his dear Ma or Oma as he would call her. Sweetly and tenderly he shared a few things about her. I was very moved.

This poem captures something of what he shared. I dedicate this poem to my friend, his family and the LORD who now securely holds Oma.

Wave

Waving goodbye

She almost always stood at that little window

and that little woman

round in form with her heart smiling,

we her family she loved, we her family she had.

Waving goodbye we smiled back,

further down the road and

a final glance revealed, the wave continued,

her love – always lingered long on the heart

like a lighthouse

radiating light and warmth

a wave of life beckoned us in

and blessed the journey out

and now we too have been waving

in loving, holding, accompanying.

Praying as this soft woman

now leans into the end of days

her journey almost over, almost begun.

And so she is gone, we weep and wave for her now –

she journeys apart from the body,

at home in the presence of the Lord.

Her head bowed here, but lifted there

He waves and beckons

and blesses her journeys end –

the lighthouse keeper with many rooms.

For if it were not so – he would not have told her.

He would not have told us

Wave – come in come in

Wave

Original poem by Humble Donkey. This poem cannot be reproduced without the permission of the author.

Waxing Lyrical on a Wednesday – Humanity’s relationship to God through Christ

Humanity’s relationship to God through Christ

Joined yet not the same.

Close yet not One.

As one though not the same One.

With yet without.

For and of.

From and to.

Enemy become friend.

Lost become found.

Creature become son.

Original poem by Humble Donkey. This poem can be reproduced electronically for non-commercial purposes, with a link to this blog.

 

 

 

 

Waxing Lyrical on a Wednesday – Come by

my love

Click image for source

 

Come by

Come by me, my love,
close, hold me to you.

Let’s stay like this, throughout the aft’
until this evening comes.

The week itself has drawn me,
left me feeling soft.

The weekend now reviving
and your heart its sweetness turns.

For the life ahead sustain me,
Walk me close to him and pray.

For the love that poured out for me,
Compelled not was the cup.

Just let the depths of our hearts,
entwine this scarlet thread.

Come by me, my love, 
your tender arms, they friend me.

Come by me, my mate,
until the morning comes.

Come by. Come by.

Original poem by Humble Donkey. This poem may be reproduced electronically for non commercial purposes, without express permission and with a link to this blog post.

Text Tuesday – The Eichenwald Files 5

This will be the last in the Eichenwald Files. All the pieces I have linked to or excerpted say similar things (consistency anyone?) and are all by credible scholars – in the world of scholars. I have posted this series each week to leave a resource trail for Christians and the ‘curious and open-minded other’ to be exposed to careful, thoughtful, rigourous and defendable material. Rarely are ordinary Christians (like me) aware of such voices or exposed to them. That is one of the purposes of the Humble Donkey.

For the last File (5) I am directing you to Dr. Dan Wallace and his response to Kurt Eichenwald’s Newsweek piece.

Phil

For source click image.

You can find the full Wallace response here as well as other interesting materials by clicking here.

But here is an interesting excerpt from the section entitled:

Error 4: Simplistic Biblical Interpretation When it Suits His Purpose

Second, Eichenwald employs other simplistic interpretations to deny the NT’s affirmation of Christ’s deity. His statement that ‘form of God’ in Philippians 2.6 “could simply mean Jesus was in the image of God” betrays his ignorance about biblical interpretation. The kenosis, the hymn about the self-emptying of Christ (Phil 2.6–11) has received more scholarly interaction than perhaps any other paragraph in Paul’s writings. To claim that Jesus’ being in the form of God may mean nothing more than that he was human is entirely against the context. The hymn begins (vv. 6–7) as follows:

“who [Christ], although he was in the form of God,

he did not regard equality with God as something to be grasped,

but he emptied himself,

by taking on the form of a slave,

by looking like other men,

and by sharing in human nature.”

Christ’s humanity is mentioned only after he is said to have emptied himself. Thus, ‘form of God’ must mean something more than humanity. Further, the parallel lines—‘he was in the form of God’ and ‘taking on the form of a slave’—are mutually interpreting. Jesus was truly a slave of God; this is how he regarded himself (cf. Mark 10.45; Matt 20.27; 26.39). If ‘form of slave’ means ‘slave’ then ‘form of God’ may well mean ‘God.’ The rest of the hymn confirms this interpretation. Philippians 2.10–11 alludes to Isaiah 45.23, where God says, “To me every knee shall bow, every tongue shall swear” (NRSV). Paul quotes this very text in Romans 14.11 in reference to YHWH—a book Paul wrote six or seven years prior to his letter to the Philippians. Yet in Phil 2.10–11 he says,

“at the name of Jesus

every knee should bend,

in heaven and on earth and under the earth,

and every tongue should confess

that Jesus Christ is Lord,

to the glory of God the Father” (NRSV).

Now the confession is about Jesus and it is a confession that he is ‘Lord.’ Either Paul is coming perilously close to blasphemy, something that a well-trained rabbi could hardly do, or he is claiming that Jesus is indeed true deity. And to underscore the point, he notes that all those in heaven, on earth, and under the earth will make this confession—language that is reminiscent of the second of the Ten Commandments, as found in Exodus 20.4: “You shall not make for yourself an idol, whether in the form of anything that is in heaven above, or that is on the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth” (NRSV). The Decalogue—known as well as any Old Testament text to an orthodox Jew—is unmistakably echoed in the kenosis. To use this in reference to Jesus is only appropriate if Jesus is true deity, truly the Lord, YHWH himself.